IOPList.Org

Full Version: Best weight loss pill?
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
I have to giggle about Alli. In a good way, not negative towards anyone at all.
When it first came out OTC in the US this girl I worked with
Who really didn't need to lose weight, showed us the warnings on the bottle. One of the warnings or suggestions was to always have a pairvofvblack or dark blue pants with you, bc if you overdid it with eating too much fat in a meal, it was coming out and there was no way to control it. It's always made me laugh, however, I do think it's the safest thing on the market. The point is you aren't relying on the drug to make you lose weight. It's all up to the individual to change their eating habits, and constantly be aware of their diets without too much cheating, because they would suffer the consequences.
I hear you, after years of yoyp dieting I've just done it the old fashioned way. myfitness pal to monitor calories, I get extra from exercise. Work out your TDEE and stick within to maintain. I used to be a skinny minny! But then as you grow older the metabolism slows down, the bollox.
I wish there was a pill that worked with no side effects ..Exercise is still the best option for anyone able ,My mom is 91 and walks 3 miles a day still,, and drives too but we won't talk about that ..........
The holy grail is a good weight loss pill.

When big pharma gets it right, it will be a money bonanza.

Unfortunately, at present things like caffeine and water/waste extracts have the best effects--- but OH MY!! the side effects.

No substitute for a balanced lifestyle but we all know that already.

<< now I bet there is another piece of pie left in the fridge >>


Folken
Weight is an area I have real scientific expertise in. The evidence is overwhelming that something in modern life, most likely chemicals that disrupt the endocrine system, are interfering with the body's weight control mechanisms and causing some people to gain large amounts of weight. In the long run, all lifestyle interventions fail. Stimulants are dangerous and addictive, and tend to shorten life span. Some people truly need stimulants for neurological illnesses, but taking them for weight loss seems to be a bad idea.

Dieting is not only ineffective in the long run, but there is increasing evidence that it makes weight problems gradually worse. When treatments are used against intelligent systems, the intelligent system fights back. This is widely known when it comes to taking narcotics, of course -- narcotics generally make suffering worse in the log run -- but it also seems to be true with dieting. Fat is the body's defense against starvation. No matter what method is used to lose weight, the brain interprets the weight loss as a sign of famine, ad tries to store even more fat.

Exercise is very healthy for most people but seems to have little if any effect on fat stores.

Bariatric surgery changes the signals the digestive tract sends to the brain, making the brain think the body has eaten a large amount of food when the body has eaten only a little. This can cause very substantive weight loss. However, bariatric surgery has many risks. I firmly believe it should be used only to treat metabolic problems, and never for cosmetic reasons.

It's important to realize that type 2 diabetes and other metabolic problems are actually caused by a shortage of adipose (fatty) tissue in which to store fat. These disorders are not caused by the amount of fat a person has. People who have little adipose tissue often get Type 2 diabetes even if they are quite lean -- this is true of many East Asians, for example. Meanwhile, some people are able to store hundreds of pounds of extra weight with no metabolic problems at all -- their bodies easily generate adipose tissue.

Our society's whole approach to weight loss is based on mistaken assumptions, which is why 100,000,000 or more Americans really want to lose weight and have made repeated attempts to do so, with no long term success.
try T4 it increases your thyroid it's an rx though. I've seen it shred weight of ppl.
(05-02-2019, 12:14 PM)magnet1153 Wrote: [ -> ]I've taken phentermine off and on over the years and had success when combined with a change of eating habits and portion size.  I haven't taken it for over 10 years due to several concerns as I've grown older.  Phentermine eventually caused me anxiety, which I then had to get medication for.  I also developed hypertension/high blood pressure probably resulting from weight gain and aging.  I quit taking it because I felt it was more harmful than helpful for me.  My doctor also let me try Contrave or Qsymia (I can't remember which one it was), which I was to start off on a pill a day, then slowly increase the dose.  Whichever one it was nearly turned me inside out once I started increasing the dose, and it made me a bit disoriented.  Nix on that one.

I have been taking over the counter Alli for a few years, which seems to help and, for me, has no side effects.  I read that the otc dose is half the strength of the prescription strength orlistat.  I suppose I could take 2 pills at a time instead of 1, but I don't.  Regarding my weight, perhaps I've just learned to love it.   Tongue
Clenbuterol with T-3 is by far the best weight loss pills you can take that does not involve adderall. Do your research and make sure you understand the cycles and how to properly take the dosages. Its incredible though.
Pages: 1 2