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Kava for Anxiety?
#1
Hey everyone. I recently came across someone who suggested I try to treat my Anxiety with Kava. Does anyone have experience with this substance? I researched it a bit but there is not much out there in terms of treatment for anxiety. Also, I was told you should t take it more than once a week. Is it physically addictive? Just looking for some more insight from a trusted community. Thanks!
“Do the Day, and let the Day do You.”
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#2
I've actually tried kava kava in capsule form from a health food store. The bottle says to take one capsule three times a day, probably to restrict the amount the body has to process, but I took two at once. They smell terrible, too, lol.

My main side effect: extreme sleepiness. As in, I just crawled into bed and took a nap. No desire to watch TV or eat or anything, just to close my eyes. Note: this will not be the same for everyone.

As with any new substance, take a single recommended dose the first time you try it (as a capsule supplement, it's not super-expensive - just don't get it from Amazon because I would never trust the quality from there). If it doesn't do anything, you can try increasing the dose once or even twice. It's apparently been used for a long time by many cultures as an anxiety/sleep-aid.
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#3
(07-28-2020, 11:49 PM)inedibleflower Wrote: I've actually tried kava kava in capsule form from a health food store. The bottle says to take one capsule three times a day, probably to restrict the amount the body has to process, but I took two at once. They smell terrible, too, lol.

My main side effect: extreme sleepiness. As in, I just crawled into bed and took a nap. No desire to watch TV or eat or anything, just to close my eyes. Note: this will not be the same for everyone.

As with any new substance, take a single recommended dose the first time you try it (as a capsule supplement, it's not super-expensive - just don't get it from Amazon because I would never trust the quality from there). If it doesn't do anything, you can try increasing the dose once or even twice. It's apparently been used for a long time by many cultures as an anxiety/sleep-aid.
Awesome! Thanks for the insight and advice. Maybe I will try and pick some up and give it a try as a sleep aid.
“Do the Day, and let the Day do You.”
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#4
(07-29-2020, 03:36 AM)Chopsticks44 Wrote:
(07-28-2020, 11:49 PM)inedibleflower Wrote: I've actually tried kava kava in capsule form from a health food store. The bottle says to take one capsule three times a day, probably to restrict the amount the body has to process, but I took two at once. They smell terrible, too, lol.

My main side effect: extreme sleepiness. As in, I just crawled into bed and took a nap. No desire to watch TV or eat or anything, just to close my eyes. Note: this will not be the same for everyone.

As with any new substance, take a single recommended dose the first time you try it (as a capsule supplement, it's not super-expensive - just don't get it from Amazon because I would never trust the quality from there). If it doesn't do anything, you can try increasing the dose once or even twice. It's apparently been used for a long time by many cultures as an anxiety/sleep-aid.
Awesome! Thanks for the insight and advice. Maybe I will try and pick some up and give it a try as a sleep aid.
Do you know where in the world this plant is from?  Any idea as to the active chemical?
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#5
It has a long history of use in southeast Asian island countries, for both recreational and ritualistic purposes. I first heard about it when I was researching anxiety-relieving alternatives, and had already discovered melatonin but was told to use melatonin only once or twice a week so I didn't become accustomed to it.

There are several active chemicals in pure kava, known as kavalactones. These have multiple effects, but the main are potentiation of GABAa receptors, similar to alcohol.

In normal dose ranges, it doesn't seem to be harmful. Liver function issues have been seen in people overusing it, but that's all I can find.

I used Wikipedia for the active chemical data, but I really prefer Erowid as the main source of information on plant-based alternatives like this because they seem to really do their research and focus on established research to inform their users. hxxps://www.erowid.org/plants/kava/kava.shtml
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#6
Hmmm very interesting reply inedibleflower. Thanks for all the great info. I’ll have to do a bit more research on my own
“Do the Day, and let the Day do You.”
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